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This election season has been one of the roughest we as a nation have seen, and has done much to divide us, create controversy and potentially damage our health. I say “damage” because our very roots as a species have programmed us to need more. For more than ninety-nine percent of our time on earth, we organized as groups, and succeeded as a race because we were driven by the common good vs. individual wants. At one time, actions that chose personal gain over the best for the tribe often resulted in being exiled from that group. Our ancestors’ survival was based on strong social connection and collaboration, so it’s no wonder that concern for others and the common good has also been associated with a better aging experience.
 
In fact, the results of the
Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (a long-term effort that has studied a more than 10,000 high school graduates until the present day) found that those who volunteered to help others had a lower mortality rate than those who did not volunteer or those who volunteered primarily for motives involving self. Because of studies like this one, the United Nations, as well as many European governments, are encouraging more citizens to volunteer, particularly for larger reasons, such as public health and safety.
 
The current political climate, however, has done much to create discord in our nation, inciting anger and stress over the potentially “wrong” candidate winning. Stress has been linked to increased risk for heart disease, cancer, dementia, and depression, whereas a mindful, compassionate view of others is associated with healthier outcomes.
 
What Can We Do? 
No matter which candidate you support, let’s aim to be respectful of opinions which may differ from our own. Consider how our attitudes and choices affect us as a society, and ultimately, as a world.
 
The Buddha told us we are what we think about; that all that we are arises with our thoughts; and with our thoughts, we make the world. What kind of world do you want?

Live Long. Live Well!

Roger Landry is the award-winning author of Live Long, Die Short: A Guide to Authentic Health and Successful Aging. In Live Long, Die Short, Dr. Roger shares a path that anyone can take, at any point in life, who wants to achieve authentic health and empower themselves to age in a better way.

 

 

 

 

He Comes from Alabama, but has always been a little Colorado.   Join us in welcoming Terry Rogers as the new CEO of Christian Living Communities. Formerly President/CEO of St. Martin in the Pines, a senior living community in Birmingham,. Read More…

Partnership with American Red Cross sends veteran interviews to Library of Congress On a crisp fall Centennial morning, Roy Christensen sat in his tidy Holly Creek Retirement Community apartment waiting to answer questions about his service during WWII. The person. Read More…

Medicare Monday at Holly Creek is on October 17th at 9:30 a.m. and October 24th at 6:30 p.m. Each year the federal government makes changes to the Medicare. Many beneficiaries are advised to go through the process of determining if. Read More…

Join Holly Creek resident Dan Parker, a noted conservationist and pioneer environmental educator, for a lively presentation about the Plains Conservation Center www.PlainsCenter.org. See how the center helps preserve Colorado’s vast grasslands and teaches the next generation to respect the. Read More…

    Do you have stiff, achy, painful joints? You’re not alone. An estimated 54 million adults are living with this chronic condition: arthritis. Arthritis steals movement and sometimes the things you love to do, but you can get it. Read More…

  “Changes in Attitudes. A New Perspective on Aging.” Session One: 10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. Coming Alive at 75: A Conversation-Hugh Petrie and Jack Hull Hugh and Jack have a lighthearted and informative conversation about the differing views of aging, human value,. Read More…

Christian Living Communities and Holly Creek welcome Terry Rogers as our new CEO & President. Russ DenBraber retires in early September after 14 years. Terry comes to us with more than 27 years of experience as a proven leader in senior. Read More…

  “Arthritis” is a term used to describe inflammation of the joints. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and usually is caused by the deterioration of a joint. Typically, the weight-bearing joints are affected, with the knee. Read More…

Drum circle leader John Robinson starts playing one of the most recognizable beats in music, a sport anthem played at arenas and stadiums across the country – “We Will Rock You” by the band Queen. Immediately the other musicians, 15. Read More…

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